“Reconciliation is not an Aboriginal problem, it is a Canadian problem.”
You may have seen this quote from Murray Sinclair in the newspaper or on television during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) events happening in Ottawa at the end of May. With the gracious support of Rev. Andrew Johnston and the St. Andrew’s congregation, I was able to attend the TRC events in Ottawa as a Presbyterian youth delegate and be a witness to these words of wisdom and calls to action for the peoples of Canada. Throughout the week, we heard stories from Aboriginal elders and youth sharing their painful experiences with the residential school system and the damage that it had done to their families and communities. But, among the tears and sadness, we also heard many messages of forgiveness, love, and most importantly, hope. This Sunday, I will be sharing my reflections from attending the TRC and the message of hope that it left within me. As we look in Mark 4 and the story of how Jesus calmed the storm, I know that if we work together with God, we are able to find a way to calm the storm that was unjustly brought upon the original people of this land.

I once again thank you for all of the support that was given to my friends and I throughout our time at Queen’s University last year, and I look forward to seeing my second church family once again and sharing this message with you.

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Coliseum in Rome, Italy where thousands of Christians were tortured and killed as entertainment for Roman citizens.

We welcome back The Rev. Dr. Karen Bach this morning to our pulpit!!

According to theologian Sally A. Brown, Ephesians 2:11-22 represents the ‘heart of the theology of Ephesians’ and ‘is meant to shake empires.  What seems like a gentle prod to Gentile and Jewish Christians to ‘get along’ with each other, is actually a highly charged and potentially treasonous claim that negates the power and privilege of the Emperors and privileged of the Roman Empire.   Similarly, this word from Paul challenges Christians of today to radical acceptance of and engagement with all people regardless of their status, their origin, their faith, or any other ways in which they are different.

 

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St. Andrew’s will be opening its doors from mid-June until the end of August as part of The Doors Open Ontario initiative to welcome and engage visitors to St Andrew’s Church during the summer tourist season. The doors will be open Tuesdays to Saturdays from 10 a.m to 4 p.m

Five years of violence in Syria continues. Millions of Syrians have had to flee their homes for other parts of the country and into other countries. All are suffering, Christians and Muslims alike. We continue to pray for peace and new beginning. And to accompany our prayers, the Session of St. Andrew’s has asked each household to consider a special offering in June to support the provision of food and temporary shelter to these refugees in the Middle East. Our support will be channelled through PWS&D and ActionByChurchesTogether (ACT – working with the Middle East Council of Churches, the International Orthodox Aid Association and World Lutheran Federation).

A member of the congregation, Martha van Allen, is offering to assist with a giant pie sale to accompany this appeal. We will be offering the pies to the community beyond the congregation, so lots of pie bakers are needed (contact Donna Delacretaz for information – all that is needed is that you can bring a certain number of pies to the church by Saturday, June 13). You can also assist by ordering a pie or two by Sunday, June 7, for pick up on Saturday June 13 – $10 for your choice of lemon meringue, cherry, blueberry, strawberry rhubarb, raspberry, and apple. Sign up on the bulletin board at the church or leave a message with the Church Office 613-546-6316 or email info@standrewskingston.org.